1918 – October 10

A quiet, restful day. Whether I am ill, or whether it is just the reaction, but I can hardly drag one leg after another and seem incapable of any physical or mental action – I just sleep and dream and read and flop about and long and long for the too-slow flying hours to pass – then when I meet Daisie I shall want the hours to linger and they will fly like a whirlwind till we reach the grave.

This war has made time fly – it seems incredible that I have been a General for nearly 4 years and I feel so very juvenile – in the rank.

1918 – October 9

Sailed at 5.30 a.m. Hot. With my face set the other way time always seemed to fly – with my face set towards Daisie in Bombay every second seems like a year and the five next days like 5 life times. A quaint Captain commanding the Egra – Captain Carré* from Guernsey, a tiny man, very religious, who says Grace before meals. The officers on board are simply “terrors”, truly we have reached absolute bed-rock – there is honestly not one of them who would have been selected before the War for a lance-corporal’s stripe. War news is still splendid – we progressing everywhere and Germany plaintively bleating for Peace.

* Carré appears to be the author of this book published in the 1930s.

1918 – October 8

Lunched on flagship with Admiral Gaunt – Dined with Senior and General Sutton. Went on board the Egra after dinner and shook the dust of Mesopotamia finally off my worn-out shoes – no particular gladness or sorrow, but nice to think of meeting Daisie.

1918 – October 6

Kut-el-Amara: Very hot and dusty and the flies are awful. Had to wait until night-fall for the train. They did me very well, giving me a nice inspection carriage with a kitchen where I could brew a cup of tea – Stork travelled with me and my excellent Batman, Milam, 1/4 Hants Regiment. Slept comfortably and arrived at Basra about 9 a.m., on October 7th.

1918 – October 5

Spent the whole morning manoeuvring with steel hawsers on a sand-bank. Got off after some hours’ work. Stuck again a good deal and at midnight got into a regular dust-storm cyclone and were properly wrecked, but nothing can really happen to these big, shallow, flat-bottomed things, so we steamed on again quite cheerfully and got into Amara on October 6th at about 9 a.m. 

1918 – October 4

Arrived Kut-el-Amara at 6 a.m. and sailed on board S/S Taraki. Lt. Colonel Wilmer, R.F.A. a very excellent companion, shares my cabin, and the 25th Punjabis, under Colonel Hunt, are on board – also Stork, my Staff Captain – The Captain of the ship is new on this ship and we have endless misfortunes – it is as well we are not in a particular hurry.