1918 – October 14

Had to put on life-belts and stand to for floating mines from 4 a.m. Rather dull work. Arrived in dock 8 a.m. Met Salusbury there, drove to Taj Hotel and found not only Daisie, but her brother Colonel Walter Keyworth, just out from home and met by accident here – delightful honeymoon!

The Marlings and the Grand Duke are staying in this same hotel.

1918 – October 10

A quiet, restful day. Whether I am ill, or whether it is just the reaction, but I can hardly drag one leg after another and seem incapable of any physical or mental action – I just sleep and dream and read and flop about and long and long for the too-slow flying hours to pass – then when I meet Daisie I shall want the hours to linger and they will fly like a whirlwind till we reach the grave.

This war has made time fly – it seems incredible that I have been a General for nearly 4 years and I feel so very juvenile – in the rank.

1918 – October 9

Sailed at 5.30 a.m. Hot. With my face set the other way time always seemed to fly – with my face set towards Daisie in Bombay every second seems like a year and the five next days like 5 life times. A quaint Captain commanding the Egra – Captain Carré* from Guernsey, a tiny man, very religious, who says Grace before meals. The officers on board are simply “terrors”, truly we have reached absolute bed-rock – there is honestly not one of them who would have been selected before the War for a lance-corporal’s stripe. War news is still splendid – we progressing everywhere and Germany plaintively bleating for Peace.

* Carré appears to be the author of this book published in the 1930s.

1918 – October 8

Lunched on flagship with Admiral Gaunt – Dined with Senior and General Sutton. Went on board the Egra after dinner and shook the dust of Mesopotamia finally off my worn-out shoes – no particular gladness or sorrow, but nice to think of meeting Daisie.

1917 – December 30

Daisie came with me to Delhi where I had to have interviews with the Chief and the Staff about my mission. We lunched with the Commander-in Chief and Lady Monro, who talked glibly to Daisie across the table about this very “Secret Mission” and told her many things I had refused to divulge to her! When state secrets are given away you may be sure the guilty ones are those in high places. Not the subordinates.

Daisie came down to Karachi to see me off, and we stayed in a nice hotel.

[Here insert Vol B – Vol C War Diary]