1918 – November 5

Arrived Peshawar 6.30 a.m., staying with the Rennies – I am glad we came here, there is no spot on earth where we would have more friends and they are good friends. Quite enough friends to keep us cheery – and I am not down on my luck. The telegrams I sent the War Office were certainly impertinent and much too strong, I see that now in cold blood, but they should make allowance for circumstances and let me off with an apology – their present treatment is certainly unjust. But what do all these petty little private matters weigh against the splendid war news – Austria, Turkey and Bulgaria unconditional surrender! and the end of the war – a victorious end – in sight.

1916 – June 18

I gave an address in the Soldiers’ Home the other day on “how we can lead the Christian Life in the Army”. And again on Thursday, we are to discuss it. There are some very fine characters among the men here. I am to go to Simla on June 30th to be invested with my C.B. by Lord Chelmsford, the Viceroy. Daisie goes to Cherat for the 4 days. The War goes on well. Verdun remains unfallen after 4 months hammering. The Russians continuing their triumphant progress against the Austrian. Our garden is full of doves, and they simply roar in the early morning. I never heard such frightfully vigorous “coos” in my life.

1914 – September 24

Villeneuve at 10.30 a.m. left at 4 p.m. Beautiful weather, but cold nights. When will this interminable battle of the Aisne come to an end? It is terribly long and makes one very anxious though I am never doubtful as to the final result and, please God, it will be decisive. Events have proved what a fine great sledge hammer machine the German Army was. It was quite able to take on France and Russia and defeat both if only England had not joined in and Austria had not proved so weak.