1915 – March 14

The weather keeps fine and yesterday was sun all day. Things go well at the front though we lose heavily, our advance to North of the La Bassée is very important and helps us to get Lille which we want badly. A family walk in the country round St. Aigran at the rate of 1 mile an hour, very tiring. Mother Delaporte, her son and his wife and their 3 children and 2 nurses and Germaine and myself – such a row of us, we quite obliterated the landscape. Dollie has now gone to work with Daisie in No. 12 French hospital under Mrs. Gardner at Havre.

1915 – January 30

Dollie [sister-in-law] and Bettie arrived Friday night from Havre; it was very nice to see them. The Prince de Mahé drove me up in his car to meet them and we drove them to the Hotel de France where I left them. To-day they did some of the Churches in the morning.

It is easy enough to live cheaply in the trenches, but on the Lines of Communication life is very dear and prices rise.

1914 – December 15

Daisie left by the 5 p.m. express for Paris, where she will meet Dollie [one of Daisie’s two sisters]. There is a chance of her getting hospital work here at last with a Mrs. Gardner – on Dec. 28th. Am dining to-night with Fernie where I shall meet Mrs. G. and talk it over. It has been a rainy week. The war drags on, the only bright spot being our sinking of the small but good German squadron off the Falkland Islands. One has hardly any hopes of anything dramatic It is just a question of who fires first. There is no doubt of eventual victory for us but when? I have always said the active war would end on May 15th, we shall see.

1914 – August 4th (Tuesday)

The War is on us and to save a rush on the banks they have declared a Bank Holiday till Friday – so no one has any money – Daisie and Bettie and I went to Paignton to see Tinnie and I had to borrow a sovereign from my father-in-law. Daisie has 6d [sixpence] and that is all. Dollie [Daisie’s sister] has just managed to escape from France.