1918 – March 29

The aeroplane arrived all right yesterday and gave a good show that impressed the people. To-day the democrats have engineered a run on the Bank – if it goes broke we’re done. Meantime Baghdad will not get troops on the move and things are very serious indeed. To-day I hope to get in a few men of the Hants and there are about 100 of the Cossacks still here if there is a row, but I want a squadron of cavalry and a couple of guns. The Germans and Turks are drilling the Kurds in the mountains close by, with the intention of swooping down on the towns, and I cannot stop them, and the famine is awful. It all makes me feel very, very old. But God is with us always. The news from France is bad, still retiring. Only from Baghdad the good news that we have captured 3000 Turks on the Euphrates.

1916 – August 16

Floods and deluges of rain – servants’ houses all flooded out and one washed right down. I am so pleased at having my proper pay of Rs.2100 a month that life seems quite different. My arrears are also Rs.1200 which enables me to pay all my debts at the shops. What a huge war this is. Bay writes from Belgium, others from France, Watts from Mesopotamia and Egypt, Irwin from East Africa, Cunliffe in West Africa, Bob and Wattie are in Salonica and here are we on the Afghan frontier. Bennett writes from Persia.

 

*Rs = Rupees

1916 – August 10

These Pathans are very outspoken and impertinent. Old Khalu came to see me to-day, an enemy Mohmand who did some secret service for me during the trouble last year. He says “You soldiers are like hawks, never know where you will be next. Sometimes like you in France, then on the Frontier here, then perhaps in Mesopotamia and so on. The Civilians are like your women-folk, while you fight and kill and lose your lives, they stay at home and look after the house and eat presents of fruit and reap the rewards of your deeds of valour!” A rather unjust view of the Indian civilian who’s just as ready as anyone to take his place in the firing line.

1916 – January 27

Miss Key came to stay. Life goes on. A year ago I was a Colonel on the Railways in France – now I am a Brigadier General and an Aide-de-Camp to His Majesty, King George V. the latter is a great honour and one I appreciate very much indeed. Nothing but bad news from every part of the front, bar in France and Russia – but the Germans must be feeling the war terribly I am sure – much more than we do.

1915 – May 27

Nights quite cool, days fiercely hot. Yesterday General Campbell, commanding the Division, Colonel Rice G.S.O. and myself, motored out to Shabkadr* and Matta to look round the Mohmand frontier. It was strange to be back in these wild parts after that war in France, all this seems like another planet. I like this command, but rather regret the pay and interest of my railway work and the comfort of Mme. Delaporte’ s house and my beloved Germaine’s French lessons. The road from Peshawar to Shabkadr in the early morning at this time of the year is very beautiful, especially the beds of lotus.

 

* Now spelt Shabqadar

1915 – April 8

Off Algiers – fine and hot but cold breeze – ideal weather. Think of them shivering in England, France and Belgium. Everyone plays the same old ship games which bore me. I hope we are beyond reach of the sub-marines now, but there was one on the lookout for us before Gibraltar. Tied on our lifebelts, Susanna’s is an enormous one, it would certainly drown her.