1916 – October 5

I’ve got wireless, aeroplanes, howitzers and motors, all quite up to date. Last night a little firing. This morning Cavalry patrol fired on from the downs, no casualties. It is fearfully hot and the mosquitos rage and the dust stifles. Duncan of the 9th Gurkhas is my Brigade Major, Waller of the 72nd, Staff Captain, Rich, 35th Sikhs (I.A.R.O.* Bombay Port Trust) Orderly Officer.

 

*Indian Army Reserve Officers

1915 – October 8

Another battle with the Mohmands. My lot in the middle on the same ground as before, but I put the Kings in the centre – on the right the 4th Brigade under Christian, the 3rd Brigade on my left under General Woodyatt*. Finished and withdrew at 4 p.m. arriving in camp at 5.0. The enemy were very half-hearted and didn’t follow up much. I had only 8 casualties and the whole Force only 3 officers wounded and 60 men knocked over. We had an awful lot of artillery, 30 guns, howitzers, field and mountain and it was mostly an artillery show. The Guides had rather a hot time on the left. I asked the third Brigade to advance there to cover my left, but I never asked them to wheel. Woodyatt stupidly wheeled them and that brought their left, the Guides, with their left shoulders up against the enemy’s trenches. Battye of the Guides** was shot through the groin, but doing well.

* Likely to be Major General Nigel Woodyatt, author of this book.
** Likely to be Captain U. I. Battye.