1917 – May 27

This affair of Leo’s* is costing me a heap of money, thank goodness it comes at a time when I can just afford it – still it is sad that these financial blows always come just as one fancies that at last one has got one’s head above water. Among other trifles! Dr. Crichton Miller’s fee is £50 for a month of treatment! and now they want me to pay £50 a term for a tutor. I have cabled certainly not – why on earth a tutor? If he has rendered himself ineligible for a first rate school he must go to a second rate one, but a tutor seems to me idiocy – he wants companionship not solitude.

* I have no record of what this is about. I suspect from the rest of the diary entry that Leo, his elder son, has not excelled at school.

1917 – April 9

At last the mail in, and at last a letter from Leo, but sad to say it was to the effect that he had had to leave Haileybury. I have planned out no career for him and do not desire any form of worldly success, I want him to be happy as a Christian gentleman, and that is always possible to the humblest of us.

 

April 9th [continuation]

Dinner with the Viceroy. Daisie sat on his left and I had the normal 5 minutes talk with her after dinner. It was quite a nice evening and their Excellencies were pleasant to talk to. Daisie’s curtseys were magnificent and her dress quite the smartest.

1916 – August 20

More rain, not at all wanted, and a sharp earthquake shock at 6.45 a.m. Daisie and I were in our dressing-rooms and lost no time in skipping out into the open where we met in the garden with our brushes and combs in our hands. The bungalow creaked and groaned and plaster began to fall, it was quite time to get outside. Church is at 7 a.m., or else we would probably have been in bed. Wrote to Leo and sent off letter as he joins at Haileybury on September 22nd.

1915 – April 3

At last! P&O S/S Moldavia, 4 berths first class, comfortable but small. Knightley and Ada, Emily, Vincent, Lou and the 2 boys came to see us off at Liverpool St. 10.25 a.m. rainy and cold. Sad farewells with the 2 boys who are old enough now to understand and who are nice enough to love their father and mother – Not for tips anyway as we gave them nothing.

Susanna is better, we were afraid she might develop measles and she had croup the other night. Very calm but cold. All lights out and all sorts of manoeuvres to baffle the German submarines. We were warned to have all our warm clothing ready at night in case we had to take to the boats. Such a sound restful sleep after all the turmoil.